Activist Spotlight: Rutgers Veg Society Inspires with Farm to Fridge PPV

In 2016, members of the Rutgers Veg Society held an engaging “pay-per-view (PPV)” video event on their college campus to inform students about the plight of animals in the industrial farming system.

Rutgers Veg Society

For those of you who may not be familiar with “PPV,” it’s a form of outreach where advocates ask the public to view short, informative videos in exchange for a small incentive, such as $1 or $2 or a vegan treat. Vegan activists use PPV as a way to introduce the public to the hard realities of factory farming and related issues in bearable doses (if there is such a thing) that can have a major impact with a minimal investment of their time.

Farm to Fridge

The Rutgers group showed the video, “Farm to Fridge” and enlightened students with information and guidance on becoming vegan — and they were delighted with the response to the event. Rutgers Veg Society was founded in 1970 to provide university students — vegan or vegetarian or those interested in learning more — with a supportive meeting place on campus. The society celebrates the many reasons for vegan living, from animal rights, personal health, environmental impact, and other issues, through regular meetings and community outreach activities. Activities include leafleting, lectures, movie screenings, potlucks, and visits to animal sanctuaries. VegFund interviewed activists, Ngoc Kim and Quadri Lasisi to find out more about this pay-per-view event and Rutgers Veg Society’s other campus outreach activities.

Rutgers Veg Society PPV Event on Campus - 2016

Rutgers Veg Society PPV Event on Campus – 2016

VF: What inspired you to get involved in vegan outreach?

Ngoc: The internet works wonders when you’re looking for individuals who have similar interests. I went vegan after watching a 4-minute video via Facebook titled “Farm to Fridge.” From this point on I started connecting with animal activists and became inspired by a few particular strong women — Kimberly Spiegel from PETA, Amy Horowitz from NJ Farm Animal Save, and Rachel Atcheson from The Humane League. I remember seeing photos of their activism on Facebook and admired how they put their passion into action. I asked, “How do I get started?” Rachel was kind enough to meet me by The Humane League’s office. I lived close by, and she simply asked, “How many leaflets would you like?” She was so generous and handed me leaflets by the boxes so I could get started during my first semester at Rutgers. Over time, I began making the connections of how veganism is not just about animal rights, but also environmental impact and health. I started joining Earth Day marches, climate marches, and joint events with other organizations. Rutgers Veg Society members, events, and alliances continue to grow bigger and stronger!

VF: What other activism or vegan events have you been involved in?

Ngoc: Most of my activism is involved with Rutgers Veg Society. We’ve been involved with numerous organizations on campus and outside the university working with 10 Billion Lives, PETA, Jewish Veg, The Humane League, Meatless Monday, HSUS, NJ Farm Animal Save, Hampton Creek, Gardein. We’ve also gained a relationship with the dining services at Rutgers to help promote Meatless Monday and add more vegan options on campus. To me, veganism is the core — and when I began seeing how it relates to the treatment of animals, environmental issues, and health … it got me thinking about how I should apply my new skill of activism to other causes. I got interested in other forms of activism such as Fossil Fuel Divestment protests and climate change marches, and I’m also looking forward to getting active with Rutgers United Students Against Sweatshops and the LGBTQ community.

VF: What were some of the responses or discussions you had during this event?

Ngoc: During the Rutgers Day event, a common response I heard was, “I didn’t know this happened. I’m shocked.” Usually, people are speechless because the short video footage disturbs them. Sometimes I don’t know what to say to them but can only sympathize as if I was them watching the video for the first time. I guide them through the photos in Vegan Starter Kits about where to get plant-based foods, how delicious they are, and how much more nutritious, too.

VF: What was the highlight of this event for you?

Ngoc: There were many highlights of this event. One — the many members and my officers in my organization who came to help set up the event and talk to the many participants about veganism. We had lines throughout the day, and if I didn’t have volunteers, I would’ve been so exhausted, and we wouldn’t have been able to reach out to many individuals in such a highly active event. Two — not only did we reach out to a high number of viewers but we were able to have one-to-one conversations about veganism. We had quantity and quality.

Quadri: In particular, when we paid people to watch Farm to Fridge, many commented on my physique because they were simply astonished that a vegan could build a sizable amount of muscle. I used this as an opportunity to discuss the health benefits of a vegan diet and lifestyle. Many pledged to either consume less meat or stop consuming meat entirely.

VF: What barriers did you face during the hosting of this event?

Ngoc: Because there are strict rules about tabling at Rutgers, we are not able to have vegan meat on display, which would have been a great way for viewers to get a taste that when you’re vegan, you’re not missing a thing.

VF: Do you have any quotes from attendees at your event or anecdotes that may be of interest to other activists?

Ngoc: A quote that was passed to me that I now use when attendees can’t seem to grasp the concept of veganism is “You wouldn’t hurt an animal unnecessarily, would you?” Another suggestion is to sympathize and understand how the attendee feels. If they’re sad, understand that and talk to them as if you were sad and watching the gruesome videos for the first time.

Quadri: Yes! A person I met during an event the Rutgers Veg Society and PETA held here at Rutgers went vegan after reading the leaflet that we handed to him. I took down his contact info, and he has since informed me that since he went vegan he has gotten stronger, leaner, and has much more energy throughout the day, definitely a reassuring anecdote. We’d like to thank both Ngoc and Quadri for taking the time to be interviewed! You can follow Rutger’s Veg Society on Facebook to stay up-to-date on their latest news.

RVS Banner

There are many ways to inspire people with your outreach efforts, and VegFund would love to help you. If you want to host an event similar to this one within your local community or on your college campus, we may be able to offer you some funding. Please read our Programs Overview for information on the types of grants we offer and how to apply.

Pay Per View Spotlight: L214 – Vegan Place in Lyon, France

l214viewerYou may not know this, but VegFund offers pay per view grants to activists all over the world, not just in the US. The only difference is that viewers in the US receive $1 cash reimbursements, whereas viewers outside the US must receive non-cash reimbursements (usually a delicious vegan treat) costing $1 or less.

One group that has done some great pay per view events is French organization L214, which does events called Vegan Place, sometimes assisted by other vegan or animal rights organizations, where they set up tables in the middle of a busy location. In addition to passing out brochures and selling some vegan food to help fund their work, they offer viewers a free vegan dessert (such as a chocolate chip cookie) for watching a video about animal cruelty in France.

l214sign

An activist holds up a sign that offers viewers a free piece of cake in exchange for watching a video.

l214crowd

l214food

One pay per view event, for example, was in the city of Lyon. In this case, they were joined by the Association Végétarienne de France (Vegetarian Association of France) and a student group called Sentience. They estimate that they reached 600 people with their work that day. Of those, about 400 tasted vegan food samples and 120 watched the video. L214 activists feel that many people at these events have their thoughts and behavior influenced both by the videos and by the food samples.

If you’re interested in doing a pay per view event wherever you are in the world, please review our guidelines and then fill out an application!

Tips for Running a Successful Pay Per View Event

By Rachel Curit, 2014 Spring Intern

Rachel PPVHave you ever heard of Pay Per View (PPV)? No? Let me explain. Essentially, you offer to pay people one dollar to watch a four-minute video on factory farming, such as Mercy For Animals’ Farm to Fridge or FARM’s 10 Billion Lives. These events are extremely successful on college campuses, but there are plenty of other places you can do them as well.

PPV is great for anyone looking to have meaningful conversations surrounding veganism and animal rights. If at the end of the day you want to feel like you’re making a real difference, try running a PPV event at your local college campus.

VegFund has a short informational video on how to host a successful PPV event, and Mercy For Animals has some great tips for getting started with PPVs, but after interning with Mercy For Animals and running a lot of PPV events myself, I’ve picked up some tips of my own along the way. Hopefully these help you have your own fun and successful PPV event.

Find out ahead of time where you need to go to check in.

A simple phone call will suffice. It’s easier than wandering around campus trying to figure out what to do. Be sure to ask the name of the building that you need to go to. It will save a lot of time and energy. While you’re at it, you might want to ask where you’re allowed to park and how much a parking pass is. Consider printing out a map beforehand.

Rachel College PPVHave multiple volunteers. Three to four is a great number.

It’s hard to do a PPV all by yourself. You’ll need at the very least two people, but three or four is better. Having a few volunteers to answer questions and get people set up with the video and at least one person to draw people in is ideal and will help your event run more smoothly.

Be honest about the video.

When people ask what the video is about, I like to say, “It’s about how animals are treated on factory farms.” Though this may sound like it will turn people away, in my experience, it doesn’t. For me, it feels more honest than saying “It’s about where our food comes from” or “It’s about farming.”

Ask viewers questions that keep the conversation going.

In my experience, asking “Do you have any questions?” is a conversation killer. After watching the video, we want people to open with their own thoughts and questions. Sometimes, though, people don’t even realize they have questions because they are still processing what they saw. This means YOU should be asking the questions.

Some of my favorite conversation starters are “How did that make you feel?” or “Did you know this is going on?” Something along those lines is perfect. Another great question you can ask once the conversation is going along are “Do you think you could ever go vegan?” If they say no, gently ask what’s stopping them and then give suggestions on how to overcome that obstacle. “Do you have any other questions?” is perfect for ending the conversation. That way, you’ve already got them thinking and some questions might be popping up.

Share your story!

People respond to personal stories. If they say they could never give up cheese, tell them about your experiences ditching dairy. Knowing that we are not alone in our journeys and that others have been in our shoes is comforting. Do you remember when you went vegan? Learning from vegans who had been there and done that probably helped you avoid making the same mistakes they did. We all learn from each other, so share your knowledge and make someone else’s transition a little easier.

Have information available on the many impacts of eating meat.

You and I know the devastating environmental impact of animal agriculture, but many people do not. Most people don’t realize how eating meat can negatively impact their health. And many still don’t realize how many resources go into producing meat and that there would be more food to go around if we cut down on our consumption. Share this information with your viewers. Sometimes animal issues aren’t enough, but when people learn that we could feed the hungry with the grains that we feed farmed animals, that has an impact. Everyone is affected by different information, and having that information handy might just be what inspires someone to go vegan! You could even have pro-vegan literature on hand that touches on these other subjects, whether it’s on water usage (PDF), health and nutrition, or even religion! Check out VegFund’s list of brochures you can use!

Know when to let go.

Once in a while, someone won’t act affected at all and you can’t stress over it. Instead, hand them the free information and let them go on their way. They may not go vegan today, but you planted a seed and that’s all you can do. Another thing to keep in mind is if they don’t show much of a reaction, they may not feel comfortable being vulnerable in front of a stranger and that’s okay. However, that doesn’t mean they weren’t affected.

Use VegFund’s resources.

You might be thinking, but I don’t have 100 dollars to give to people. That’s where VegFund steps in to help! You can apply for mini-grants and if you’re approved, VegFund will reimburse you for the money you hand out. Check out this page for more information on how it works.

So what do you think? Would you ever run a PPV event? We’d love to hear your thoughts on this form of outreach!

 

Starting a Campus Animal Rights Group

By Leslie Brefeld, 2014 Winter Intern

Vassar Animal Rights Coalition (VARC) distributes hundreds of vegan food samples and brochures at their college's activities fair.

College campuses are an ideal place to start an animal rights group. Not only are the students open to new ideas, but it gives those involved a great way to creatively express their passions.

AR groups allow you to meet with other like-minded people, to get experience as an activist, to inform, and maybe even inspire, many others.

Even though the number and diversity of animal rights groups is growing, there are still many schools and colleges that don’t have an animal rights/vegan group. If you’ve ever thought about starting a group at your school, but didn’t know where to start, we’re here to help! In this blog, we’ll be listing five tips to starting a group at your college or university, and you’ll get expert advice from current college students who have started, or are a part of, an animal rights group. Creating a vegan or animal rights group doesn’t have to be hard, but it will definitely be rewarding!

1. REGISTER YOUR GROUP

If you want to be affiliated with your college, which means use of their resources, like rooms to meet in, faculty help and greater exposure, sign up to be a school organization. Find out what is needed to get that accomplished through your school’s student affairs or student life office.

Expert Tip: Oxy VegHeads founder at Occidental College in California, Brandi Tebo, described this first step: “So one of the first things I did when I got to college was found veg club. I started by going into the office of student life, sitting down with a coordinator, and asking what I needed to do to get it rolling! Then I filled out the necessary paperwork, and started advertising! I made up these cute little flyers and posted them everywhere around campus, then spent a lot of time planning the first meeting and never looked back!”

2. GET TOGETHER

Set up an informational meeting. Hold it in a public place, maybe in the student lounge or veg-friendly campus food court, so random people aren’t showing up at your house or dorm. During the meeting, find out what people’s interests are and what they would like to do through the group. Make sure to get everyone’s contact information, and if necessary, take up a small donation to cover any costs you incurred by hosting the meeting or to help cover costs for the next meeting. Take notes. You can help newcomers get up to speed by recapping the last meeting’s notes at the beginning of the next meeting. You may also want to think about assigning each other roles so everyone has a clear idea of what their part is.

Resource: Check out the UK Vegan Society’s How to Start a Vegan Group.

Expert Tip: Kitty Jones of the Berkeley Organization for Animal Advocacy described her experience in a college group, after having started a group in high school. “I’m now one of the leaders of Berkeley Organization for Animal Advocacy (BOAA) and am trying to use what I learned from high school in managing this group. BOAA was founded in 1999 at UC Berkeley. BOAA also has no set hierarchy, however there are definitely a few members that are particularly involved. I think that having member roles/hierarchy would make the group work more smoothly and efficiently though.”

Kitty Jones of BOAA gives out samples of vegan ice cream3. DECIDE WHAT YOU’RE ALL ABOUT

Think of what excites you. Leafleting? Tabling? Making meals to share? Creating an animal rights film festival? Starting a vegan mentor program? You can also find inspiration by looking at other student-run vegan and animal rights groups’ websites to see how they are structured and what the various tones/styles of the groups are.

Resources: Check out “Plant Peace Daily” by Jim Corcoran and Rae Sikora. This book includes tons of ideas for activism that can be done alone or with a group. Other great resources are major vegan and animal rights organizations. Look to their websites for information, activist activities, funding and general support. Some of the biggies are Vegan Outreach (for leaflets and tips), and of course VegFund, for resources and funding.

4. MEET WITH REGULARITY

Make sure you give your group a chance. If you don’t have a lot of people at your meetings, don’t be discouraged. Give it some time and think of new ways to bring people in.

Expert Tip: “Whether this is a weekly dinner, bi-weekly movie-screening, etc., make sure that there are certain regular events in place that people enjoy coming to and they know they can rely on. This is the backbone of your organization,” Tebo wrote in an email.

5. MINGLE

Once you are a solid group, don’t be afraid to get out there and network. Keep an eye out for how other groups and yours might have things in common or would just like to do something together. You many never have the opportunity to be around as many people willing and wanting to get together as you do in college.

Expert Tip: According to Alessandra Seiter, co-president of the Vassar Animal Rights Coalition at Vassar College in New York, working together with other groups is valuable. “For every event we host, we reach out to other student organizations and academic departments who we think would be interested in co-sponsoring an event. For example, six other campus groups–such as the Food Committee and French Club–co-sponsored our recent Vegan “Wyne” & Cheese Tasting because their missions related to our event,” Seiter wrote. “The most important piece of advice I can give is to network. Having a strong community of driven individuals is indispensable in making a large impact with activist work.”

Good luck and have fun!

Are you part of a campus AR/Vegan group? If so, we’d love to hear about your experience. Please leave a comment below.

Nov/Dec 2013 Volunteer Spotlight: Wendy Eikenberry

Wendy talks about her journey to veganism and shares her approach to animal advocacy. 

I have two amazing sisters who have always been an inspiration to me. Despite the fact that our parents were meat-eaters, both of my older sisters went vegetarian at a young age. They helped me “make the connection” and stop eating my animal friends when I was about seven years old. We went vegan about 4 years ago when my oldest sister found out about the horrific cruelty behind dairy and eggs. For all those years, how could we not have known or questioned it? I felt a moral obligation to share with others what I had learned. It was then that I found my true passion and started advocating for animals.

At first I thought that surely people would change if only they knew the truth, but I quickly learned that that wasn’t usually the case. Although dealing with many challenges such as willful ignorance and apathy can be discouraging, I strongly believe in leading by example and presenting the information in a non-confrontational way. I try to use a firm but understanding approach when advocating for veganism and animal rights. Most of us were not born vegan, and we’re all on our own unique paths.
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I am lucky enough to be part of an incredible organization called Indiana Animal Rights Alliance. We educate through leafleting, protests, food sampling, letter campaigns, film screenings, and Pay Per View. I also volunteer for Mercy for Animals, Vegan Outreach, and FARM whenever I can. For the past two and a half years, I have had the privilege of helping with one of VegFund’s online campaigns geared toward young people. I really enjoy educating the younger generation and being a mentor. I am currently going to school for nursing, and my goal as a future nurse is to be an advocate for healthy eating while also reducing animal suffering.

Vegan Earth Day Outreach

By Kimberly Dreher, VegFund Program Director

On April 22nd, over a billion people from around the world will join together in celebration of Earth Day. Many will be open to learning what they can do to reduce their eco-footprint, and since going vegan is one of the most important steps one can take for the planet, this makes Earth Day a perfect outreach opportunity. To help you gear up for your Earth Day outreach, we’ve compiled some helpful tips and resources. If you have additional ideas, please leave a comment. We love hearing from you!

Education: You don’t need to be an environmental expert to host or table at an Earth Day event. However, it doesn’t hurt to spend a little time brushing up on how veganism is good for the planet. Lots of resources can be found online, but to save you some legwork, check out our recent AR Trends article. It provides a thorough summary of research on the environmental benefits of veganism.

Leaflets: Whether you’re tabling at an event or hosting a screening, chances are you won’t get the opportunity to have in-depth conversations with everyone. That’s one of the reasons why it’s so important to have literature. In addition to brochures that discuss the positive impact veganism makes for the animals, for an Earth Day event, you’ll also want to have literature that covers the environmental benefits. Here are a few options to consider:

  • Compassion Over Killings’ Eating Sustainably: A trifold brochure that explains how animal agriculture is the leading cause of global warming, resource depletion, and pollution, and how we can fight for the environment by going vegan. It’s available for order in bulk quantities, including 25 for $4, 150 for $15, 500 for $40, and 1,000 for $65.
  • Action for Animals’ Go Green, Go Vegan: A flyer with a wealth of information on the negative environmental effects of raising animals for food. Global warming, air pollution, water pollution, deforestation, and species extinction are just a handful of the many topics that are covered. Because the handout covers so much information, there is a lot of text and no images, which makes it less eye-catching than other options. It’s available for order in bulk, costing just $2.50 for 50 flyers.
  • Nonviolence United’s A Life Connected: Small booklet that encourages people to make choices that align with their values. This positive and colorful booklet points out that veganism is good for the animals, planet, and people, but unlike the other options, it doesn’t get into specific facts on veganism and the environment. It’s available for order in bulk, including 100 brochures for $15, 200 for $29, 500 for $69, and 1,000 for $139.
  • Vegetarian Resource Group’s Save Our WaterThis colorful handout gives a compelling presentation for the environmental benefits of veganism. It covers the impact that animal agriculture has on the water, air, and land, and also includes various tables that clearly show the inefficiency of meat production. This handout isn’t available for bulk order, so it must be downloaded and printed.

Finding or Promoting an Event: Earth Day is celebrated in 192 countries! With thousands of communities participating each year, it’s likely that there’s an Earth Day event happening in your area. Tabling at a community event and giving out free vegan food samples along with educational literature is a great way to engage the public. To find an Earth Day celebration near you, browse the event calendar in your local paper or try an online search.

If there isn’t an event in your area, you might consider organizing your own. There are a range of possibilities, including feed-ins on college campuses, film screenings, and festivals. For those who are organizing events, promotion is essential. For great tips on advertising your event, read through VegFund’s Advertising 101 post.

Films: In recent years, there’s been an explosion in the number of documentaries that explore how our food choices affect the environment. If you’re tabling at an Earth Day event, playing a short documentary on a loop can be a great addition to your booth. Or, you might consider organizing a screening for a longer documentary. Here are a few titles that are worth checking out:

  • A Life Connected: An uplifting 12-minute video that explains the many benefits of making vegan choices.
  • Making the Connection: This 30-minute film is divided into eight chapters and explores how becoming vegan is good for our health, the environment, and the animals. It features interviews with dietitians, elite athletes, environmental groups, and more. Chapter 6 is about 4 minutes long and is specifically focused on the environment.
  • Meat the Truth: This is a 72-minute documentary about global warming that focuses on what many other environmental films, like an Inconvenient Truth, leave out: the impact of raising animals for food. This film is available in 10 languages.
For more video ideas, visit the Environment & Sustainability section of VegVids.com.

Eco-Friendly Outreach: Finally, whether or not it’s Earth Day, we should always strive to make our outreach as environmentally-friendly as possible. To see how well you’re doing, and for some great tips, read through Make Every Day Earth Day.

If you’re in need of support for your event, apply for a grant today! Now, let’s get out there and start making a difference!

Valentine’s Day Outreach Ideas

By Kimberly Dreher, VegFund Program Director

Valentine’s Day is just around the corner and is an excellent opportunity to encourage the public to extend love and compassion to all living beings. Recently, we reached out to several experienced animal advocates and asked how they promote veganism on February 14th. These excellent suggestions are sure to spark your own creative outreach ideas.

Kitty Jones (Berkeley Organization for Animal Advocacy)

  • Distribute Action for Animals’ Veg Valentine’s fliers.
  • To add some zest to your table, use a red tablecloth.
  • Even if the food itself isn’t themed, the people serving it should look festive!
  • If you have an animal suit, have one of the volunteers wear it. You can affix a paper heart with a vegan message to the costume. This is a great way to make the event fun and to draw more attention.

Elaine Vigneault (Vegas Veg)

  • Host a vegan Valentine’s Day potluck.
  • Encourage guests to bring vegan foods that are red or pink.
  • Ask vegans to bring their non-vegan friends and family members.

Barbara Bear (NonviolenceUnited.org)

  • Organize a Pay Per View event. To tie the event into Valentine’s Day, use signage that says, “Have a heart for animals” and give viewers heart-shaped vegan lollipops.
  • Distribute vegan Valentines in a busy public area (e.g., college campus, farmers market, or community event). Consider making Valentine’s cards that have a photo of a cute farm animal with some information on the benefits of veganism. Be sure to also include a link to a vegan website so people can learn more. A small fair-trade vegan chocolate or other small vegan treat can be attached to each Valentine.

Jaya Bhumitra (Compassion Over Killing)

  • Last year, Compassion Over Killing volunteers hosted a successful food sampling event and gave out these delicious vegan cookie truffles from VegWeb.com.
  • They’re easy to make, easy to transport, and the public loved them.

 

 

 

 

Do you have other great ideas for vegan Valentine’s Day outreach? We want to hear from you! Post your ideas and experiences below.