Activist Spotlight: Rutgers Veg Society Inspires with Farm to Fridge PPV

In 2016, members of the Rutgers Veg Society held an engaging “pay-per-view (PPV)” video event on their college campus to inform students about the plight of animals in the industrial farming system.

Rutgers Veg Society

For those of you who may not be familiar with “PPV,” it’s a form of outreach where advocates ask the public to view short, informative videos in exchange for a small incentive, such as $1 or $2 or a vegan treat. Vegan activists use PPV as a way to introduce the public to the hard realities of factory farming and related issues in bearable doses (if there is such a thing) that can have a major impact with a minimal investment of their time.

Farm to Fridge

The Rutgers group showed the video, “Farm to Fridge” and enlightened students with information and guidance on becoming vegan — and they were delighted with the response to the event. Rutgers Veg Society was founded in 1970 to provide university students — vegan or vegetarian or those interested in learning more — with a supportive meeting place on campus. The society celebrates the many reasons for vegan living, from animal rights, personal health, environmental impact, and other issues, through regular meetings and community outreach activities. Activities include leafleting, lectures, movie screenings, potlucks, and visits to animal sanctuaries. VegFund interviewed activists, Ngoc Kim and Quadri Lasisi to find out more about this pay-per-view event and Rutgers Veg Society’s other campus outreach activities.

Rutgers Veg Society PPV Event on Campus - 2016

Rutgers Veg Society PPV Event on Campus – 2016

VF: What inspired you to get involved in vegan outreach?

Ngoc: The internet works wonders when you’re looking for individuals who have similar interests. I went vegan after watching a 4-minute video via Facebook titled “Farm to Fridge.” From this point on I started connecting with animal activists and became inspired by a few particular strong women — Kimberly Spiegel from PETA, Amy Horowitz from NJ Farm Animal Save, and Rachel Atcheson from The Humane League. I remember seeing photos of their activism on Facebook and admired how they put their passion into action. I asked, “How do I get started?” Rachel was kind enough to meet me by The Humane League’s office. I lived close by, and she simply asked, “How many leaflets would you like?” She was so generous and handed me leaflets by the boxes so I could get started during my first semester at Rutgers. Over time, I began making the connections of how veganism is not just about animal rights, but also environmental impact and health. I started joining Earth Day marches, climate marches, and joint events with other organizations. Rutgers Veg Society members, events, and alliances continue to grow bigger and stronger!

VF: What other activism or vegan events have you been involved in?

Ngoc: Most of my activism is involved with Rutgers Veg Society. We’ve been involved with numerous organizations on campus and outside the university working with 10 Billion Lives, PETA, Jewish Veg, The Humane League, Meatless Monday, HSUS, NJ Farm Animal Save, Hampton Creek, Gardein. We’ve also gained a relationship with the dining services at Rutgers to help promote Meatless Monday and add more vegan options on campus. To me, veganism is the core — and when I began seeing how it relates to the treatment of animals, environmental issues, and health … it got me thinking about how I should apply my new skill of activism to other causes. I got interested in other forms of activism such as Fossil Fuel Divestment protests and climate change marches, and I’m also looking forward to getting active with Rutgers United Students Against Sweatshops and the LGBTQ community.

VF: What were some of the responses or discussions you had during this event?

Ngoc: During the Rutgers Day event, a common response I heard was, “I didn’t know this happened. I’m shocked.” Usually, people are speechless because the short video footage disturbs them. Sometimes I don’t know what to say to them but can only sympathize as if I was them watching the video for the first time. I guide them through the photos in Vegan Starter Kits about where to get plant-based foods, how delicious they are, and how much more nutritious, too.

VF: What was the highlight of this event for you?

Ngoc: There were many highlights of this event. One — the many members and my officers in my organization who came to help set up the event and talk to the many participants about veganism. We had lines throughout the day, and if I didn’t have volunteers, I would’ve been so exhausted, and we wouldn’t have been able to reach out to many individuals in such a highly active event. Two — not only did we reach out to a high number of viewers but we were able to have one-to-one conversations about veganism. We had quantity and quality.

Quadri: In particular, when we paid people to watch Farm to Fridge, many commented on my physique because they were simply astonished that a vegan could build a sizable amount of muscle. I used this as an opportunity to discuss the health benefits of a vegan diet and lifestyle. Many pledged to either consume less meat or stop consuming meat entirely.

VF: What barriers did you face during the hosting of this event?

Ngoc: Because there are strict rules about tabling at Rutgers, we are not able to have vegan meat on display, which would have been a great way for viewers to get a taste that when you’re vegan, you’re not missing a thing.

VF: Do you have any quotes from attendees at your event or anecdotes that may be of interest to other activists?

Ngoc: A quote that was passed to me that I now use when attendees can’t seem to grasp the concept of veganism is “You wouldn’t hurt an animal unnecessarily, would you?” Another suggestion is to sympathize and understand how the attendee feels. If they’re sad, understand that and talk to them as if you were sad and watching the gruesome videos for the first time.

Quadri: Yes! A person I met during an event the Rutgers Veg Society and PETA held here at Rutgers went vegan after reading the leaflet that we handed to him. I took down his contact info, and he has since informed me that since he went vegan he has gotten stronger, leaner, and has much more energy throughout the day, definitely a reassuring anecdote. We’d like to thank both Ngoc and Quadri for taking the time to be interviewed! You can follow Rutger’s Veg Society on Facebook to stay up-to-date on their latest news.

RVS Banner

There are many ways to inspire people with your outreach efforts, and VegFund would love to help you. If you want to host an event similar to this one within your local community or on your college campus, we may be able to offer you some funding. Please read our Programs Overview for information on the types of grants we offer and how to apply.

Make a Resolution to Be a Voice For Animals In 2017!

Happy New Year from VegFund!

Last chance to make your resolutions for 2017.

How about…

Resolve to organize or participate in a vegan outreach event!

VegFund is here to help.

If you’re new to vegan advocacy, find local vegan groups in your area. A few good places to look:

  • Meetup groups
  • Search social media (Facebook and Twitter, especially) for groups near you
  • Ask at your local veg restaurant
  • Join the planning team of a local VegFest

Find out what events they have on the calendar for 2017 — and volunteer! If they don’t have outreach events planned, suggest a food-sampling event, a documentary screening, leafleting, or video pay-per-view — and make sure they know that VegFund can help with grant-based support.

Or, start your own group! If there aren’t vegan groups in your area, get one going. Expanding vegan living into new areas is a fabulous goal for the new year.

If you’re a veteran activist, start the new year with some creative outreach planning. We have a few suggestions for you based on our 2016 survey of our grantees. Here’s what worked for them:

Host a Documentary Film Screening

Educate and entertain the public with a screening of one of the many excellent documentaries relating to animal agriculture. With an ever-growing choice of documentaries in this area, you’re sure to find something suitable whether you want to engage people on topics of animal rights, the environment, or health and nutrition.

FMVeg Minnesota - Cowspiracy Screening 2016

“The reception was fantastic, with one of the viewers wanting to host his own viewing, with my (and your) help!” – FMVeg, Minnesota – Cowspiracy Screening 2015

VegFund grantees use a variety of venues for film screenings. The three most common are:

  • local church facilities
  • town halls
  • college campuses

The documentaries most commonly screened by our grantees are:

  • Cowspiracy
  • Vegucated
  • Peaceable Kingdom
  • Forks Over Knives

Find out more about hosting a screening here.

Before the event:

  • Set up a Facebook event for the screening and invite your connections! About one month before the event should suffice. List the event venue, date and time, and any other important details. Include a blurb about the documentary film — and note if you’re including a Q&A session.
  • Post the event page within veg groups and other relevant groups on a regular basis in the weeks before the event.
  • Put up posters at the venue and other strategic locations in run-up to the event. Local print shops are usually happy to offer help or guidelines in setting up and printing your materials.

The day of the event:

  • Find out in advance what time you can gain access to the venue to start your preparations.
  • Plan to be at the venue 1–2 hours before the event to give you time to arrange the room, put out chairs, set up the projector, and lay out additional materials such as educational literature and food samples.
  • Leave the venue as you found it. Settle up any outstanding fees with the venue.

Host a Food Sampling Table at a Local Fair

Food sampling is a simple but effective form of outreach. Just book a stall at a suitable event, plan and prepare your food items, and turn up on the day with some volunteer support.

“AWESOME! Thanksliving went so much better than I could have ever hoped!! I had so many wonderful helpers and we gave out all the samples two hours sooner than I had expected! We got nothing but positive responses. We literally ran out of vegan fliers to hand out. Everyone LOVED the food.” – Students for Animal Rights Thanksliving event

Kindred Spirits Care Farm - Food Day LA 2016

Kindred Spirits Care Farm – Food Day LA 2016

Our grantees typically set up food sampling tables at:

  • local community fairs and markets
  • green festivals
  • health fairs
  • college campuses

The most popular types of vegan food samples handed out are:

  • mock meat products, such as Tofurky and Gardein products
  • plant milks – offer a variety such as soy, almond, and coconut
  • homemade cookies and cupcakes

The day of the event!

  • Set up before the event starts and be sure to keep your table tidy and sample trays full.
  • Dress smart-casual and have a smile on your face. Presentation is key to enticing people to stop for a taste.
  • Rotate your staff if you have volunteers. Prepare a schedule in advance to ensure everyone gets a break during the day.
  • Check out our blog on effective communication for tips on engaging with people about vegan living.
  • If you’re part of a vegan group, have a clipboard for sign-ups.

VegFund’s suggested sources for literature to hand out:

Learn more about food sampling events here.

What other outreach ideas does VegFund consider?

We provide grant support for a whole variety of vegan outreach activities, and we’re always interested in new and creative ideas — online campaigns, vegan fashion shows, speakers, vegfests, and more. See the Merit Awards section of the VegFund website for guidelines on funding innovative projects that promote veganism. Some examples from the past year:

Slovensko vegansko društvo (Slovenian Vegan Society) hosted Vegafest 2016. More than 10,000 people were reached by the event, with an estimate of 7,000 non-veg people visiting the festival itself.

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Dzīvnieku brīvība in Latvia held a Vegan Summer Solstice celebration where they served vegan cheese samples to attendees and distributed educational literature. Activists engaged in some really positive discussions, with many people showing an interest in making steps towards vegan living.

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This type of outreach is funded through VegFund’s Merit Awards program.

Learn more about our program guidelines and apply for a grant today!

Wishing you the very best of luck with your outreach in 2017.

- The VegFund Team

5 Top Tips for A Successful Pay-Per-View Video Event: Findings from VegFund’s Five-Year Retrospective Study (Part 4)

In this fourth and final part of our Effective Outreach series, we’re looking closer at Pay-Per-View (PPV) video events. In this form of outreach, individuals learn while they earn! VegFund pays viewers to watch a short clip exposing the truth behind the animal industry, from the cruelty of factory farming to environmental destruction.

Our grantees from the past five years have provided really valuable feedback for improving and developing the effectiveness of this type of outreach — and we want to share this information with you!

MFA volunteers, Mid West Northalsted Market Days, 2015

MFA volunteers
Mid West Northalsted Market Days, 2015

PPV inspires discussion! Use videos as an inroad to talk with people in more depth. PPV outreach usually evokes more emotional responses than food sampling or literature-focused events due to its visual element, and asking viewers about their response to a video is a natural way to initiate a conversation. PPV events are also a great way to attract media attention and get coverage about animal-welfare issues.

“I don’t think I’ll be able to eat meat for the rest of the day or ever. Something definitely needs to be done about this.” – PPV viewer response

During 2011–2015, VegFund-supported activists encouraged a total of 58,672 people to view videos on vegan and animal-agriculture-related topics. They also distributed 30,813 vegan food samples and 424,182 pieces of educational literature to event attendees.

The most popular short videos to show to date have been “Farm to Fridge” and “Meet Your Meat.”

The top 3 venues or types of event for activists to host PPV are:

1. University and college campuse

2. Festivals (green, community themes

3. Education days and spaces

5 Top Tips!

1. Event activities and attendance: Many activists favor combining PPV with food sampling and information booths. This combination appears to attract significantly larger crowds that include people who do not wish to watch the video footage. At information booths, some organizations included vegan starter packs or guides.

2. Video length: Four-minute video footage has been the most popular length to show, followed by 11 minutes. A short but informative video appeals to people because it doesn’t take up too much of their time.

3. Common questions to prepare for: Attendee questions often relate to organic meat, cage-free eggs, “free-range” food, current animal welfare laws, and how widespread animal cruelty is. Be prepared with informative answers and, if possible, have literature on hand for attendees to take with them.

4. Booth location: At veg fests, for maximum impact, select booths near companies that provide vegan food. Activists holding PPV events can then easily direct people who are interested in knowing more about food options and products to these nearby booths.

5. Effect of incentives: PPV incentives can be customized for your audience. Many activists have found success with a Cake-Per-View or Donut-Per-View event where full-portion, delicious food is provided instead of cash. When possible, offering the $1 and a food sample seems to work best!

“I enjoyed interacting with the people who volunteered to watch and had not seen footage like that previously because it reminded me of how eye-opening that first exposure to the gruesome truth was for me years ago.” – Compassionate Action For Animals volunteer, Twin Cities Veg Fest

MFA volunteers at USC, Long Beach College Campus, 2016

MFA volunteers at USC
Long Beach College Campus, 2016

Activists find that PPV is an effective tool for engaging people on the topic of farmed animals and prompting them to reflect on their own eating habits.

“Thank you for sharing; very informative.” – PPV Viewer response

“Where can I find vegan recipes?” – PPV Viewer response

If you’re ready to host a PPV event, take a look at VegFund’s Pay-Per-View instructional video and checklist!

We hope the tips offered in this blog series provide useful pointers for your vegan outreach efforts or help inspire new activists to get involved.

Current activists! Send us your success stories so that we can share your experience with others.

Our mission is to support YOUR fabulous work as vegan advocates. Take a look at our Facebook page to see what other VegFund-supported activists are doing. Get inspired to host your own event! We’d love to support you.

And, finally, from all at Vegfund, best of luck with your future outreach efforts. You inspire us.

8 Tips for Effective Animal Advocacy: Findings from VegFund’s Five-Year Retrospective Study (Part 1)

Our mission is to support YOUR fabulous work as vegan advocates.

We recently carried out a five-year retrospective study of our three main grant programs — Food Sampling, Film Screenings, and Pay-Per-View video events. In doing so, we consolidated valuable information supplied by our grantees in their feedback that could bolster the effectiveness of future outreach efforts of all vegan activists.

This installment is the first in our series of tips for effective animal advocacy. These tips will offer helpful pointers to maximize your effectiveness in communicating your message to as many non-vegan people as possible.

In this blog post, we’ve highlighted techniques commonly practiced by advocates that have received particularly positive responses.

Kindred Spirits Care Farm, Food Day LA 2015

Kindred Spirits Care Farm, Food Day LA 2015

Food Sampling

  • Food is always a brilliant conversation starter!
  • Food sampling events that coincide with another event, such as a vegan- or animal-welfare-themed film screening, festival, or conference have more impact and reach a higher number of people.
  • Offering literature to people who are sampling food gives them a handy takeaway. Recipe brochures are very popular.

Check out our blog Selecting Effective Outreach Materials —a helpful reference when selecting the literature to distribute at your event.

Film Screenings

  • Q&A formats are popular, particularly when they include film directors, activists, or people involved in the subject matter of the film.
  • Events advertised in advance via social media, in local cafes or community centers, on campuses, and through leafleting busy streets, have a higher turnout.

Pay-Per-View (PPV) Video Events

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Mercy For Animals, US
Atlanta Pride Fest 2015

  • PPV, where viewers are offered a small cash or food incentive to watch a video, is a fantastic discussion-raising form of outreach. Use it as an inroad to conversing with people in greater depth.
  • PPV incentives of 1) cake-per-view, 2) more than $1, or 3) $1 plus free food were far more popular than those offering only $1 incentives.
  • When PPVs are combined with food sampling and information booths, they attract larger crowds because not everyone wishes to watch the video footage.

Feedback from grantees on the success of their events using some of these tactics included comments such as:

“Many of them never before ate vegan food, and all of them loved it!”

“It definitely challenged people’s understandings and perceptions of animal industries …”

Comments from people who attended events held by VegFund-empowered activists included:

“I don’t think I’ll be able to eat meat for the rest of the day or ever. Something definitely needs to be done about this.”

“I’m definitely going to eat less meat now.”

Depending on your audience and venue, there are some especially effective ways to engage people with the animal rights and vegan message. Following this introductory blog, we will present in-depth information on proven techniques for each of VegFund’s grant programs based on feedback from activists around the globe, so stay tuned for lots of great information on food sampling, film screenings and pay-per-view outreach!

And lastly, thank you to all VegFund grantee activists who shared their event feedback with us. You have made this blog series possible.

Coming next: Part 2 of this series offers some great tips on making the most of your food sampling events.

Pay Per View Spotlight: L214 – Vegan Place in Lyon, France

l214viewerYou may not know this, but VegFund offers pay per view grants to activists all over the world, not just in the US. The only difference is that viewers in the US receive $1 cash reimbursements, whereas viewers outside the US must receive non-cash reimbursements (usually a delicious vegan treat) costing $1 or less.

One group that has done some great pay per view events is French organization L214, which does events called Vegan Place, sometimes assisted by other vegan or animal rights organizations, where they set up tables in the middle of a busy location. In addition to passing out brochures and selling some vegan food to help fund their work, they offer viewers a free vegan dessert (such as a chocolate chip cookie) for watching a video about animal cruelty in France.

l214sign

An activist holds up a sign that offers viewers a free piece of cake in exchange for watching a video.

l214crowd

l214food

One pay per view event, for example, was in the city of Lyon. In this case, they were joined by the Association Végétarienne de France (Vegetarian Association of France) and a student group called Sentience. They estimate that they reached 600 people with their work that day. Of those, about 400 tasted vegan food samples and 120 watched the video. L214 activists feel that many people at these events have their thoughts and behavior influenced both by the videos and by the food samples.

If you’re interested in doing a pay per view event wherever you are in the world, please review our guidelines and then fill out an application!

VegFund: Using the Most Powerful Tools Available

Our friends at the Humane League Labs did a survey of current vegans, vegetarians, and meat reducers. Here is what got people to start down the veg road:

This is why one of the main outreach actions VegFund pursues is screening documentaries. It is somewhat more difficult than, say, leafleting, but as you can see, it is so much more effective! That is why VegFund gives such priority to these events.

Congratulations to all our advocates who have put on a screening in your area. And thanks so much to all of VegFund’s supporters for making this – and all our outreach – possible!

If you want more people to stop eating animals, please click here!

 

 

Video Nation: Evolving Our Advocacy

Here at VegFund, we’re sometimes asked why we put such a high percentage of our limited resources into video outreach.

It is important to remember what was cutting-edge in we could do for the animals 20 years ago is no longer the best we can do today. It is important that we evolve with the times, to give the animals the biggest bang for the buck.

This New York Times article – Video Nation – explains a bit of how things have changed:

“We are roused to action by cruel realism, but only if it looks and sounds authentic. Reasoned calls to our better angels are no longer enough.”